NEWS - pag. 2 ❤️

Cani e gatti ❤️ rivista Dog Style 2 En

Cerberus, the biggest dog famous in the world... even more than Lassie! The guardian of the gates of Hades. The hound of hell. The three-headed dog... In short, Cerberus: perhaps the most famous dog in the entire history of animals. Even without knowing the name, the image of a mastiff with 3 heads is so iconic that it carries with it a whole series of very specific meanings: strength, ferocity, but also resilience and steely determination. According to Zachary Grey, Shakespeare's editor and commentator, the three heads of Cerberus represent the past, the present and the future. It is one of Typhon’s children, a gigantic monster known for almost dethroning Zeus, and Gaea, and its job is to guard the gates of Hades, so that the deceased cannot escape. According to the myth, the only (living) human beings who have been able to tame it are Heracles, thanks to his prodigious strength, and Orpheus, thanks to the sweetness of his music. The “Beware of the dog” warning? We copied it from the Romans! The Romans were pioneers of the future in many aspects: engineering, law, war art but also social administration; it was in fact good practice for every family that owned a dog to have, at the entrance to their house, a mosaic depicting a dog (not very docile in appearance, so to speak) tied to a leash, reading "CAVE CANEM" which literally means "Beware of the dog". The Romans' modus operandi was to copy everything from everyone and make it more effective. They did the same with dogs, already used in battle by the Greeks and Egyptians (Alexander the Great's favorite dog’s name was Peritas). Dogs underwent long phases of crossbreeding and subsequent training, until the legionary's perfect battle companion was obtained: the Canis Pugnax, from which both the Neapolitan Mastiff and the Cane Corso descend. Canis Pugnax had to pave the way for the legions advance, charging the enemy first and causing havoc and terror among its ranks, which is why it was often protected by armor and spiked collars. German Shepherd: did you know that…? After the Second World War, as might be expected, anything even remotely connected to Germany became unwelcome to public opinion; to prevent such a precious breed from being damaged, another name was introduced to define the German Shepherd, which became known as the Alsatian Shepherd. It would remain so until 1977. The progenitor of this breed was named Hektor Linksrhein, whose owner was so in love with its extraordinary qualities as a worker that he mated it several times until he managed to isolate all the psychophysical characteristics he wanted; all the German Shepherds we see today are Hektor's great-grandchildren. The German shepherd was the first guide dog in history; today its versatility is immense: pet therapy, search, rescue, army, and anti-drug... in short, man's best friend and best colleague. Smartest dog breeds: which is on the podium? It is impossible not to mention the Labrador: one of the most used breeds as "guide dogs" for their docile and affectionate temperament but above all for their great intelligence, which allows them to memorize more than 100 different words. Then there is the poodle: an excellent swimmer and already used in the past for duck hunting and as a water retriever; this, combined with its liveliness, makes it a perfect dog for agility. Finally, the Border Collie, famous worldwide for its great intelligence which makes it the perfect companion in any situation. It was born as a shepherd dog but it would be reductive to classify it solely as such: the Border Collie is perfect both as a companion dog (for example for pet therapy) and as a guide dog or rescue dog. They are extremely receptive to commands and have great problem-solving skills, which means that they are much more likely to come up with the solution to a problem on their own without the owner or instructor telling them how to do it. British Shorthair or THE apartment cat Their lordship of all sofas … The British Shorthairs, the apartment cats par excellence. Descended from cats imported into Britain by the Romans, they lived in the wild until the 19th century, when Harrison Weir decided to select the peculiar blue shade of their coat and presented a specimen during a cat show at the Crystal Palace in 1871... Since then, it has become one of the most loved apartment cats. According to an interesting legend, British Shorthairs descended from an Egyptian cat named Scota, owned by General Gaytholos, who attempted to chase the Jews during the crossing of the Red Sea; when his mission failed, in order not to return to his homeland where a severe punishment certainly awaited him (let's remember what the Pharaoh was going through after 10 biblical plagues), Gaytholos decided to flee to Great Britain and called the place where he landed in honor of Scota: and thus Scotland was born.

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